NAGA

manager in Portfolio 2014.06.30
Tanai #6

Tanai #6

Tanai #1

Tanai #1

Hukawng Valley #1

Hukawng Valley #1

Mekyen Village #1

Mekyen Village #1

Lahe #13

Lahe #13

Lahe #5

Lahe #5

Nanyun #5

Nanyun #5

Nanyun #9

Nanyun #9

Nanyun #12

Nanyun #12

Lahe #12

Lahe #12

Nanyun #15

Nanyun #15

Nanyun #11

Nanyun #11

Lahe #11

Lahe #11

Nanyun #28

Nanyun #28

Nanyun #29

Nanyun #29

Lahe #19

Lahe #19

Tanai #3

Tanai #3

Ledo Road #6

Ledo Road #6

POST/(東京)2015

POST/(東京)2015

POST/(東京)2015

POST/(東京)2015

POST/(東京)2015

POST/(東京)2015


先に津田の旅を人類学者のフィールド・ワークになぞらえた。だがそれが決定的に違っているのは、彼が人類学者のように、未開の人々の社会・言語・文化などを調査・研究することで、人類の思考や行動を論理的、体系的に構造づけようなどとは毛頭考えていないことだ。彼が写真撮影によって成し遂げようとしているのは、むしろ「静けさ」、「白さ」、「遠さ」といった独特の「しるし」を持つ人たち=Mentorたちにとっての世界像を、写真というこれまた独特の視力を備えた装置によって、ありありと浮かび上がらせるということに他ならないのではないか。
(『NAGA』飯沢耕太郎テキストより)


Earlier, I compared Tsuda’s trips to an anthropologist’s fieldwork. What is definitely different is the fact that Tsuda has no will to form logical and systematic structure of human thinking and behavior by investigating these desolate places and people by their societies, languages, and culture like an anthropologist.  Instead, what he is trying to achieve in photography is to bring into surface, using a unique equipment called photography, the perspectives of those Mentors who possess unique marks such as “silence,” “whiteness,” and “distance.” 
(From Naga, Text by Kotaro Iizawa)

Comments are closed.