Puhu nin Amukaw

manager in Portfolio 2016.07.21

Puhu nin Amukaw #3

Puhu nin Amukaw #3

Puhu nin Amukaw #4

Puhu nin Amukaw #4

Puhu nin Amukaw #5

Puhu nin Amukaw #5

Puhu nin Amukaw #6

Puhu nin Amukaw #6

Puhu nin Amukaw #7

Puhu nin Amukaw #7

Puhu nin Amukaw #10

Puhu nin Amukaw #10

Puhu nin Amukaw #11

Puhu nin Amukaw #11

Puhu nin Amukaw #14

Puhu nin Amukaw #14

Puhu nin Amukaw #16

Puhu nin Amukaw #16

Puhu nin Amukaw #21

Puhu nin Amukaw #21

Gallery 916/(東京)2014

Gallery 916/(東京)2014

Gallery 916/(東京)2014

Gallery 916/(東京)2014

 

写真はフィリピン・ルソン島のピナトゥポ火山周域のものだ。ピナトゥボ火山は、90年代初頭に大噴火したが、その成層圏にまで達するほどの噴煙と灰により、その年、世界中の夕焼けが異様なまでに赤く変化したほどだった。大地は吹飛ばされ火口湖となり、大量の灰が地につもり、土石流を生み、土の河が人も家も森林すべてを洗い流した。まるでノアが体験した洪水のようだ。破壊に見えてしかし、それは、「新しい道」の出現でもあった。その地に住む者(彼らは2万年前からピナトゥボ山麓に住みつき、肌の色が黒いのでネグリートと呼ばれる)は、荒涼たる場所から、新しくくらしを生む。津田はその中のアエタ族の集落で一時を過ごす。その首(おさ)であるローマン・キングととも行動し、さまざまなことを教わることになる。灰の中から最初に芽を出し、実るのは、amukawとよばれるワイルドバナナであった。子どもたちが、磁石を使って河原の水の中から砂鉄をとって売る。ここには、近代文明がつくったものなどは、一切流されて、無い。ある日津田が、ローマン・キングに誘われ山の頂上で見たものは、かなたから来る人々の姿だった。彼らこそ、大噴火後も先祖から受け継ぐピナトゥボの神、アポ・ナマリアーリを信仰するため、再び山のそばへ帰っていった人々だ。
灰混じりの川を数時間かけて歩き集う者たちは、互いの物を交換しあい、くらしに必要な糧を得る。火山の破壊のあとで生まれたもの、景色の中で交わり生まれるもの。小さなワイルドバナナは糧の中心的存在であり、心である。津田は、それを知る。
(「On the Mountain Path」展@Gallery 916 後藤繁雄 「山の目になる 津田直の写真のために」会場テキストより抜粋)

 

Photographs are of the area around Mount Pinatubo on the island of Luzon in the Philippines. Mount Pinatubo experienced a major eruption in the early 1990s, billowing smoke and ash as far as the stratosphere to the extent that in the year in question sunsets around the world turned unusually red. Earth was thrown into the air and a crater lake was formed, a large quantity of ash accumulated on the ground, and lahars occurred, sweeping away people and houses and forests in rivers of mud. It was almost like the flood that Noah experienced. It looked like complete destruction, but at the same time it represented the appearance of a “new path.” The people living in the affected area (who settled at the foot of Mount Pinatubo more than 20,000 years ago and are referred to as “Negrito” due to their dark skin color) are forging new lives out of this scene of destruction. Amidst this, Tsuda spends time in an Aeta village. He works alongside the village headman, Roman King, and learns various things from him. The first plant to put its head above the ashes and produce fruit was a wild banana known as amukaw. Children use magnets to remove iron sand from the riverbeds, which they then sell. Here, everything produced by modern civilization is gone, washed away by the lahars. One day, Tsuda is led by Roman King to the top of a mountain from where he sees people approaching from the distance. They are people returning to live by Mount Pinatubo, drawn by their faith in the deity of the mountain, Apo Namalyari, a faith that remains strong even after the 1991 eruption. Gathering after walking for hours along rivers clogged with ash, they exchange belongings and acquire enough provisions to make a living. New customs that emerged in the wake of the destruction wreaked by the volcano, changes in the surrounding landscape. The small wild bananas play a central role in providing nourishment, both physically and spiritually. This much Tsuda knows.
(From the text Becoming the eyes of the mountains – Looking at Nao Tsuda’s photographs by Shigeo Goto, On the Mountain Path exhibition at Gallery 916)

Comments are closed.